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BSG Technologies Qol Print
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p_reale
April 3, 2012, 8:57am Report to Moderator
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I hope that this forum is not completely dead. There has been a lot of discussion about the BSG Technologies Signal Completion Device on the Audiogon Discussion Forum (I have participated in that). I am bringing this topic up, because I have found that the BSG Qol is a good match for my Sound Lab M-1 PX's. Since electrostatics are ruthlessly revealing, the effect of putting this new device in the signal chain is very interesting. Has anyone here tried it?
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RalphW
April 3, 2012, 11:48am Report to Moderator
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Quoted from 36
I have found that the BSG Qol is a good match for my Sound Lab M-1 PX's. Since electrostatics are ruthlessly revealing, the effect of putting this new device in the signal chain is very interesting. Has anyone here tried it?

I remain leery of products that scramble phase the same way for all content.  With my HT system, I have a choice of similar DSP modes said to "improve" the sound.  Honestly, I don't find any improvement with them.

It might help if you were to tell us about the rest of your system and the positive difference you perceive listening to a specific recording or two.

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samujohn
April 3, 2012, 6:06pm Report to Moderator
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I am certainly interested, but also skeptical. I use the Tact active equalization and room compensation algorithms. Tact also markets Ambiophonics, which i do not use, but is yet another catompensation algorithm.
We are certainly at the gate of a whole new era in our understanding of the relationship between reproduced sound, and our experience of hearing same and comparing it to "live".
If memory serves, Peter Walker, of Quad fame, was asked how much of the original sound he was able to reproduce. He estimated his success at about 15%.
I am inclined  to agree. Speakers, electronics, etc. are very good. The much bigger problem is still the signal that they are are feed.
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p_reale
April 3, 2012, 8:46pm Report to Moderator
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Number one: the process of "recreating"will not give you the actual live musical event. We are talking about a "believable illusion."  Randomization of the attacks is a mechanism for replicating  the  effect of live performance. My system consists of "one off" proprietary components that have been redesigned to work in my space. The sources are a traditional turntable (SOTA with handmade  Grado cartridge. The phono stage is the last generation  Threshold which feeds a PS audio power supply. The digital front end is an EMM labs Signature edition CDSD pair that has been modified by The Upgrade Company. The preamp is a proprietary unit that has has no  volume controls but digital switches. The modified Sound Lab M-1 PX's  have specially designed crossovers and power supplies (my design,using Clarity stuff). Amplification is by the Bryston monsters which put out at least 600 watts per side. Rear channels I already talked about (amp for rear is Audio Research 120). Room is about 20x75, with a 23' ceiling over most of it. All the electricity is fed by a special set of circuits that are filtered using matricies designed for electron microscopes. The walls of the listening room have wood, and absorbing and reflecting plaster, used as a result of extensive pink noise tests. All components rest on a separate platform, isolated from any vibration. All the interconnects are Audioquest XLR (best grade)  and the speaker cable is Kimber 12Tc  (latest). I hope that covers everything.
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RalphW
April 5, 2012, 1:00pm Report to Moderator
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Quoted from 36
I hope that covers everything.

Except for citing a recording or two and explaining what you perceive the differences to be.

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p_reale
April 6, 2012, 5:28am Report to Moderator
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I used three specific recordings: the M&K Realtime direct to Disk LP "For Duke." This recording really captures what a jazz group sounds like in a real space. Using the Qol creates just a bit more air to the sound. Any CD's from the Set  of the Complete Haydn Symphonies (Austro-Hungarian Orchestra, Adam Fischer cond. on Brilliant Classics). Using this set, which shows the development of Haydn's symphonic style as instruments are added and more complex materials are used, the Qol stabilizes the image and enlarges the sound field 9but not to the point of being overblown). The Aaron Copland SACD reissue with Leonared Bernstein and the NYP is already an exciting sound: the Qol seems to smooth out the edge to the recording which always bothered me in the past. I have the same recording on LP; and, in that case the effect is less, but still very engaging.
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rockcity
April 9, 2012, 12:03am Report to Moderator
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The next launch is organized on this springtime. Now I cannot say exactly which new functions will be done for that period.



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RalphW
April 13, 2012, 2:25pm Report to Moderator
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Quoted from 36
Using the Qol creates just a bit more air to the sound.

May you enjoy the phase shifts.

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